Samsung’s efforts to save Galaxy Note 7 possibly hindered US regulators from closely investigating it

Samsung’s efforts to save Galaxy Note 7 possibly hindered US regulators from closely investigating it

Samsung’s efforts to save Galaxy Note 7 possibly hindered US regulators from closely investigating it

In an article published on Sunday, The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) said that Samsung's efforts to save its ill-fated Galaxy Note 7 flagship handset - which has now been discontinued - evidently hindered US regulators from closely investigating the device.

The Galaxy Note 7 handset was launched by Samsung in August; and recalled -- within barely two weeks of launch -- on September 2, due to reports, by some users, about overheating and exploding batteries of the device.

The announcement of the recall of all the 2.5 million units of the handset sold worldwide by Samsung -- till September 2 -- apparently came as a surprise to the US regulators.

When Samsung formally notified the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) -- the agency which oversees product recalls, so as to assist in the investigations into the cause of malfunctions -- about its recall of the Galaxy Note 7 handset, the company decided to opt to "pursue what's known as fast-track resolution with the CPSC."

The move opted by Samsung enables companies to eliminate hazardous products from the marketplace. Moreover, the mentioned option also allows companies to ensure that the CPSC does not "make a preliminary determination (PD) that the product contains a defect that creates a substantial product hazard."

Meanwhile, though Samsung has officially discontinued the problems-plagued Galaxy Note 7 handset, the WSJ said in its article: "Samsung still doesn't have a conclusive answer for what's causing some Note 7s to catch fire."