Facebook may not remove offensive graphic content if it is “newsworthy”

Facebook may not remove offensive graphic content if it is “newsworthy”

Facebook may not remove offensive graphic content if it is “newsworthy”

In a recently released blog post, Facebook has revealed that it plans to reduce censorship of graphic content; and will soon start displaying more offensive content -- including violence and nudity -- provided that it is important or "newsworthy."

The disclosure in the blog post implies that Facebook will leave offensive images and other content posted up on its website - even if the content violates the company's community standards - if it considers the content to be important enough to be seen or read by the users.

Facebook's decision to reduce censorship of content is apparently rooted in the widespread criticism faced by the company when it temporarily removed the iconic 'Napalm Girl' image of a nude child from the Vietnam War. The image was uploaded by a Norway-based newspaper editor as part of a series related to war photography.

The censorship of the famous Vietnam War image by Facebook resulted in profound media and public backlash, and the company eventually decided to retreat and restore the image.

In revealing that Facebook will display more graphic content which is "newsworthy," Joel Kaplan - the company's Vice President of global policy - said in the blog post: "Our intent is to allow more images and stories without posing safety risks or showing graphic images to minors and others who do not want to see them."