Call for Stronger Regional Haze Rule Might Face Opposition from the Coal Powered Energy Industry

Call for Stronger Regional Haze Rule Might Face Opposition from the Coal Powered Energy Industry

Smoke and haze from coal fired power plants drift to national parks and wilderness obscuring the visibility by up to sixty miles. The authorities are trying to address the same problem in Denver, Colorado so that the habitat and the wilderness have lesser impact and visibility issues from the pollution.

It is not easy to work out Obama administration's proposal to constrict regional haze rule nationally which also faces opposition from the industry and over the time line as to how fast the states must implement their plans to meet the goal of Regional Haze Rule, which mandates the restoration of "natural" air conditions in hundred and fifty six national parks and wilderness areas by 2064.

To achieve the goal of restoring perfect natural clarity and the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed that all states would be compelled to control air pollution spreading beyond the boundaries of that state.

At an EPA hearing Jen Clanahan, a member of Colorado Moms Know Best, testified "Our protected natural areas are some of the few places where I thought I could take my daughter and not have to worry about pollution." She added, "If I can't take her to our national parks to escape, I'm not sure where to go. It leaves me feeling like we can't escape the pollution we're breathing in all the time, like I can't get my daughter away from it."

However, the industry officials maintain that the coal-fired power plants and other fossil fuel facilities that are currently operational must keep working.

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