Overweight individuals may have poor memory, study

Overweight individuals may have poor memory, studyAccording to a new healthcare study, overweight young adults may have poorer memory compared to others in the same age group who are within prescribed weight limit.

The new research by researchers at the University of Cambridge said that overweight young adults are likely to find it more difficult to recall past events than others. The study is the latest to indicate that there is a link between memory and overeating. The study is small in size but the results are in line with existing findings that excess bodyweight may be linked to changes to the structure and function of the brain as well as its ability ty performs some cognitive tasks properly.

The researchers from the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge said that they have found evidence of a link between high body mass index (BMI) and poorer performance on a test of episodic memory. It known thatobesity is linked with dysfunction of the hippocampus, which is a brain area controlling memory and learning and also of the frontal lobe, a brain area responsible for decision making, problem solving and emotions.

There have been clear indications that it affects memory but the evidence have been limited. Experts also said that obesity increases the risk of physical health problems as well as psychological health problems, such as depression and anxiety.

Dr Lucy Cheke said, "Understanding what drives our consumption and how we instinctively regulate our eating behaviour is becoming more and more important given the rise of obesity in society. We know that to some extent hunger and satiety are driven by the balance of hormones in our bodies and brains, but psychological factors also play an important role - we tend to eat more when distracted by television or working, and perhaps to 'comfort eat' when we are sad, for example."

Thepreliminary study was published in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.

 

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