John Graham-Cumming’s Plan 28 to be supported by London’s Science Museum

John Graham-Cumming’s Plan 28 to be supported by London’s Science Museum  With The Science Museum in London having assured assistance to a project for developing British mathematician Charles Babbage's mechanical computer, digitising of Babbage's sketches and notes and their public availability is apparently on its way.

The museum's consent to the project, being headed by programmer and computer historian John Graham-Cumming, has come as a result of campaigners' request for access to Babbage's designs located in the museum archives, for the purpose of the creation of a fully-functional edition of mathematician's Analytic Engine.

It was last year that Graham-Cumming initiated Plan 28 - the project to get the complete Analytical Engine built in the UK -; and the museum's support implies that the team working on the project will be able to commence its work soon.

The museum has already, since September 12, started digitising Babbage's plans and notebooks. The Plan 28 team will likely be able to begin the study of these notes early next month.

Noting that the museum's consent marked the fact that "the first step" on Plan 28 is "underway," and expressing his gratitude towards The Science Museum and other supporters of the project, Graham-Cumming said in a recent post on his blog that the work which his team has undertaken "will benefit not only Plan 28 but all those who wish to study Charles Babbage's work wherever they are."

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