Google’s Street View raises security fears in Israel

Google’s Street View raises security fears in IsraelIsrael released an official statement saying it a team of its cabinet ministers is working with web search giant Google to find out safer ways to implement its Street View feature in the country.

The statement emerged after various officials raised concerns that Google's Street View service, which provides ground-level three-dimensional images of street, could be exploited by terrorists to plan attacks.

Intelligence Minister Dan Meridor, who is heading a task force to determine whether to let Google or not to photograph the streets in sensitive areas such as places where the president’s and prime minister's residences are situated.

Showing concerns over the controversial service, retired Lt. Colonel Mordechai Kedar said, "We already have problems with Google Earth, which exposes all kinds of facilities.”

In other countries also, privacy advocates have been criticizing the service, claiming it could jeopardize the security of the people and property.

Google's Street View service, which lets users to virtually tour places on a map, is already available in as many as twenty-seven countries.

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