China

Internet disruptions in Asia indicate long altercation between Google and China

Internet disruptions in Asia indicate long altercation between Google and ChinaThe Internet disruptions that Asian users faced this week are an indication of a long altercation between China and the Internet search giant.

Australian Government and Google Tied in Net Censorship Battle

Australian Government and Google Tied in Net Censorship Battle

Stephen Conroy, the Australian Communications Minister, has bitterly attacked the search engine major Google and its credibility in direct response to the company's campaign against the Government's Internet filtering policies and regulations.

Google practically fighting a lone battle against Web censorship in China

GoogleWhile Google is overtly confronting China, attempting to rewrite the rules for Internet freedom in the country, the apparent lack of support from US corporations is a clear indication that Google is fighting a lone battle.

Google shutters operations in China; Obama administration “disappointed”

GoogleGoogle has finally made its stance clear on the thus far dilly-dally decision to shutter its operations in China after the January cyberattacks – the company disclosed on Monday that it would stop censoring search results in China; and readdress its Chinese home page traffic to its un filtered Hong Kong site.

US trade officials weighing China Internet censorship case

US trade officials weighing China Internet censorship case In his Tuesday remarks at the National Press Club, US Trade Representative Ron Kirk revealed that though the country is assessing its possibilities of legally challenging the Internet restrictions imposed by China, direct talks with the authorities may bring about faster results.

Soft Drinks Cause of Pancreatic Cancer

Soft-Drinks-Pancreatic-CancerAccording to the study of Singapore Chinese Health, those who drink two or more soft drinks per week are facing the danger of pancreatic cancer. There is 87 percent higher risk of emerging the disease. They examined 60,000 people in Singapore over 14 years having regular soft drinks.

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