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Teens trying potentially dangerous vaping method called ‘dripping’

US News - Tue, 02/07/2017 - 08:33

One-quarter of American teens who have experienced e-cigarettes have also tried a potentially dangerous vaping method called “dripping,” a new substance abuse behavior study revealed.

The potentially dangerous vaping method of dripping involves dropping liquid nicotine directly onto the e-cigarette’s hot coils to produce thicker and more flavorful smoke.

Dripping is drastically different from normal vaping that slowly releases the liquid. Dripping may expose users to higher levels of nicotine as well as to harmful non-nicotine toxins, like acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, which are carcinogens.

Suchitra Krishnan-Sarin, a Yale professor of psychiatry who led the study, said, “When people smoke cigarettes, they say they smoke it for, for lack of a better word, a tingling in the back of the throat … The teen brain has been shown especially sensitive to nicotine.”

Sixty-four per cent of the surveyed high school teens revealed that used dripping to get thicker smoke, 39 per cent said they did so for getting better flavor and 28 per cent said they did that for the stronger throat hit or sensation.

The researchers reported their findings in the most recent edition (Feb. 6th) of the journal Pediatrics.

General: HealthResearch

South Korea confirms foot-&-mouth disease at dairy farm

US News - Mon, 02/06/2017 - 09:10

South Korean authorities have confirmed that a cow bred at a farm in North Chungcheong Province has been tested positive for foot-&-mouth disease (FMD).

According to a statement released by the Ministry of Agriculture, Food & Rural Affairs, the confirmed case of FMD was detected at a dairy farm in Boeun county, around 170 kilometers southeast of Seoul.

Taking a precautionary step to prevent the disease from spreading further, authorities ordered culling of all the 195 cows that were raised at the farm.

It is not the first time that the agriculture ministry of South Korea has confirmed an outbreak of FMD. Previously, a case was discovered at a hog farm in the south part of the Chungcheong Province in March 2016.

The outbreak comes as South Korea, the fourth largest economy in Asia, has been grappling with a countrywide spread of virulent bird flu virus that was first detected in November 2016, prompting authorities to cull more than 33 million farm birds.

Authorities will soon hold a meeting to discuss further measures to contain the spread of the disease, including an absolute ban on movements by livestock as well as people who spent time at farms in North Chungcheong.

General: HealthRegion: South Korea

Altria trying to figure out if recalled tobacco products were tampered with

US News - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 07:17

Altria Group Inc., one of the world's largest producers and marketers of tobacco, cigarettes and related products, announced on Friday that it was working with government authorities to determine if it's recently recalled smokeless tobacco products were tampered with.

Earlier this week, Altria issued a voluntary recall for some of its smokeless tobacco products after more than half a dozen consumers complained that they found sharp metal objects in some cans.

The recall of smokeless tobacco products involved certain cans made in the company's Franklin Park, Illinois, facility. The company said there might be a deliberate, malicious act by someone familiar with the quality and safety procedures at its manufacturing facility in Illinois.

Confirming the ongoing investigation, Altria said, "We believe this was a deliberate, malicious act by an individual or individuals familiar with the quality and safety procedures at its Franklin Park, IL facility."

The tobacco giant is retrieving recalled products from wholesale, retail as well as individual consumers. Smokeless tobacco products made at a separate facility aren't affected by the recall.

General: HealthCompanies: Altria

President Trump takes Hair Loss Drug Propecia: Physician

US News - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 18:38

President Donald Trump’s physician Dr. Harold N. Bornstein has revealed in a recent New York Times interview about the drugs he takes for hair loss and rosacea. Dr. Bornstein informed that he hasn’t had any contact with Mr. Trump after he became President. During the elections, health issues of President Trump became an election issue but his doctor gave him a certificate of perfect health to lead the country.

Dr. Bornstein informed that Trump takes propecia for hair loss and the medication has helped his condition. Additionally, Dr. Bornstein informed that President Trump also takes medication for rosacea. He also takes regular dosage of aspirin to reduce his risk of health disease.

Propecia is a popular medication for hair loss. It is a low-intensity dosage of finasteride that is prescribed to men with enlarged prostate glands. It is usually sold under the brand name Proscar. The drug blocks the body's production of male hormones.

Propecia was approved by the U.S. FDA in year 1997 for male pattern baldness. The low-cost dosage of finasteride is only allowed for men. The FDA hasn’t permitted propecia for women or children.

Regarding the interview with New York Times, a senior White House official has informed that Dr. Bornstein wasn’t having President Trump’s permission to talk about his health.

During elections, Dr. Bornstein gave the certificate of good health to President Trump. He said, "If elected, Mr. Trump, I can state unequivocally, will be the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency."

Regarding the possible side effects of Propecia, pharmaceutical company Merck says, “Patients taking the drug should promptly notify their doctor if they experience changes in their breasts, rash, itching, hives, swelling of the face or hands, or difficulty breathing or swallowing.”

As per reports, “The FDA-approved pill has been called into question, with emerging research and a slew of lawsuits suggesting that finasteride may be more dangerous than previously believed. Users report that its side effects — inability to orgasm, painful erections, chronic depression, insomnia, brain fog, and suicidal thoughts — can last long after patients stop taking the pill.”

Region: United StatesGeneral: FeaturedHealthPeople: Donald Trump

Doctors, nurses urge Cleveland Clinic system to cut ties to Trump

US News - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 08:52

Hundreds of medical professionals and students have urged the Cleveland Clinic hospital system to cut its ties to President Donald Trump in light of his controversial executive order that has banned people from some Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

A large number of physicians, nurses and students signed an open letter yesterday pleading with the hospital system to publicly condemn the executive order that banned immigration from seven countries. They urged the system to use its influence to protect medical professionals from forced banishment.

They also urged the system to cancel a fundraiser scheduled for later this month at President Trump’s Palm Beach, Fla.-based Mar-a-Lago resort.

The open letter reads, “Through this action you are supporting a president who has, in his first ten days in office, reinstated the global gag rule, weakened the Affordable Care Act, fast-tracked construction of both the Keystone XL and Dakota Access Pipelines through legally protected native lands, and banned legal U.S. residents from majority-Muslim countries.”

Cleveland Clinic spokesperson Eileen Sheil said the hospital system is incredibly proud of its highly diverse workforce as well as patient population. But, Sheil indicated that the planned fundraiser could not be cancelled because the sole purpose of the event is to raise funds for important research.

General: HealthResearchCompanies: Cleveland

Healthy Indiana Plan seeks extension until Jan. 31, 2021

US News - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 08:59

As U.S. President Donald Trump and Republican Congressmen are pushing ahead with their plan to repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), Vice President Mike Pence’s home state of Indiana on Tuesday sought to extend a regulatory waiver and funding for the healthcare program for the next many years.

Indiana requested the Trump administration to allow it to extend its package of incentives & penalties intended to encourage low-income Medicaid families to adopt healthful behaviors until Jan. 31, 2021.

Under the state program, beneficiaries have to pay premiums for getting health savings accounts. They can lose their benefits in case they miss payments.

V.P. Pence is now in support of the idea to repeal ACA, which is also known as Obamacare, but the Healthy Indiana Plan that he had launched in 2015 as the state’s governor has provided Medicaid coverage to more than 350,000 residents.

In its request, Indiana said continuing the Medicaid expansion would cost it an estimated $1.5 billion but it would bring it $8.6 billion in federal funding from 2018 to 2020.

Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, said, “Indiana has built a program that is delivering real results in a responsible, efficient, and effective way. I look forward to maintaining the flexibility to grow this remarkably successful tool and to preserve our ability to respond to the unique needs of Hoosiers.”

Indiana’s request demonstrates how even Republican-controlled states that expanded their Medicaid health programs under the ACA have become dependant on additional federal dollars to pay for those expansions.

General: HealthPeople: Mike Pence

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